Abuse

Rise in Rape Statistics

I live in both Birmingham and Sunderland, depending on the time of term that it is so I spend my time reporting on both cities. As I have an interest in investigative journalism I spend a lot of time looking into published police statistics on disclosure logs looking for something to look into.

Recent statistics from West Midlands police show that the number of rape and sexual assault victims get higher each year. The recent statistics of rape in Sunderland have also climbed dramatically since 2012/13 as they are now 6 times higher than they were back then.

Birmingham: In 2016/17 there has been 1647 reported rape and sexual assault instances, with only 161 perpetrators summoned to court and 22 charged for the crime. The numbers of reports have been rising since 2013 as that year there were 775 incidents. There were 1206 reported in 2014 and 1412 in 2015. The highest amount of reports in 2016/17 has been identified to have taken place in the west of Birmingham with 475 reports from this area. There were only 47 of these lead to a court case and only 6 were charged.

Sunderland: In recordings from 2016/17 there have been 171 reported of rape and sexual assault in the area in comparison to the 29 reports in 2012/13. Out of the 171 rape reports in the last year, only 77 were charged with the offence. The statistics show that the most common factors about the victims were that most of the victims were female, aged between 11 and 25.

UK wide: Rape statistics across the country were said to have doubled within the last 4 years all across the UK according to reports in October 2016 but have been climbing following the Jimmy Saville scandal in late 2012. Although, according to rape centres 43% of victims are still unlikely to report as they feel like they will be blamed for the attack or because they feel like the courts favour the offender as most reports don’t lead to charges.

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The noise…

Having anxiety is hard enough but having an exceptional memory to go with it is even harder.

Learning to shut out memories is difficult and every bad one becomes a part of the noise in your mind, a noise that no amount of external sound can drown out.

Every name you’ve ever been called.

Every heartbreak or feeling of loss.

Every traumatic event.

Everything bad thats ever been talked about you.

 

NONE OF THIS STUFF GOES AWAY. Not with out help. And that is exactly what people like me need to find, help.

5 Ways I Relate To Harley Quinn

Harley Quinn aka. Doctor Harleen Quinnzel… Let’s be honest here she is the prettiest and most lovable female psychopath on screen, in animations and comics… but for some reason, I can relate to her character quite a lot.

5: She Knows She Annoys People

Harley is very self-aware of how annoying she can be and knows that it just might get her hurt or even killed. Let’s face it, in the real world, you are often told not to open your mouth to the wrong person because it will get you hurt and I am always self-conscious about annoying people. So much so, that I now warn people that I will annoy them eventually.

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4: Her Cringe-Worthy Pick-Up Lines to Her Beloved Mr. J

We are all known for making cringy puns and pick up lines when all up in some boy or girls DMs, well Harley becomes queen of them all as she tries to bed her pudding in Batman: The Animated Series.

Let’s be honest, I can’t be the only one who relates to this way of flirting, right?

3: She Had High Aspirations In Life

Let’s not forget that before she became the infamous Harley Quinn she was Doctor Harleen Quinzel of Arkham Asylum in Gotham. Being a doctor takes a lot of hard work and dedication, especially to work in a psychiatric hospital filled with the world’s craziest criminals, am I right?

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It is a shame that she gave it all up for Mr. J, but the wrong kind of relationship such as the domestic abuse she receives from her “pudding”  can ruin all aspects of your life.

2: She Wears A Smile For Her Man

In a violent relationship, you do anything to keep the abuser happy…

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Her referral to him as her “boss” rather than her partner, shows her position in Mr. J’s life as not only does he think her inferior but she thinks that of herself too. She’ll do anything to keep him happy, which seems to include smiling on demand.

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1: She is a Domestic Abuse Survivor

OHHHHH, here’s the part everyone who idolizes her  9because of Suicide Squad) forgets about…Harley and Joker aren’t “goals”.

She’s a victim, or more was, she seems to have become more of a survivor now.

Sure, she doesn’t handle it as well as real abuse victims would… becoming a serial killer and all that but she survives and she’s definitely a stronger woman from embracing the effects the abuse have had on her mind. She’s fierce!

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10 Signs You’re in an Abusive Relationship

Abuse can sometimes be a hard thing to distinguish, especially if it isn’t 100% obvious that it’s happening. It can be true what they say, love is blind. You could be told time and time again by all your friends that you ‘need to get out of there’ or ‘get rid of them’ but until you see it yourself or wake up from whatever fairy tale romance that you think you are in, it is impossible to get out.

As a woman who has experience abuse both physically and mentally in relationships, I have compiled this list of signs so you can recognise them yourself.

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It’s #NotACompliment to Birmingham Students

Jennens Court residence have been made uncomfortable by men lingering outside the halls to ‘catcall’ young women.

Charis Pardoe said that there is often a black car spotted need the Jennens Court Halls of Residence for Birmingham City University in which a group of men will sit and “shout at girls all the time.”

Catcalling has been an issue that’s spread UK wide through the #NotACompliment campaign that has aimed to get misogynistic acts such as street harassment to be taken more seriously under the category ‘hate crime.’

It has gained success in areas several areas nationwide but is still being dismissed by West Midlands Police.

West Midlands Police stated that ‘catcalling’ among other forms of street harassment ‘is not a crime as it isn’t aggressive. Being attacked because of your race, religion, because you’re gay or have an alternative gender identity is a hate crime.’

Despite it’s apparent “non-aggressive” nature, Birmingham Students have said that it makes them feel unsafe.

“I believe that street harassment should be considered a hate crime because of how offended it makes me feel,” says Vicky Bentley (18), Birmingham City University Student, “Harassment like this could lead to sexual assault.”

. A recent poll done by End Violence Against Women states that 85% of women in the UK have faced unwanted sexual attention between the ages of 18 to 24, 45% of these cases also experienced unwanted sexual contact and the majority of these women had their first ‘catcalling’ experience between the ages of 11 and 17.

As the evidence suggests street harassment has fast become a common problem but the #NotACompliment campaign is still aiming to get the issue taken seriously so that young women are able to walk the streets and feel safe.

 

Top 3 Short Films That Will Hit You Hard!

These short films have gone viral over the past few years and have captured the attention of many people around the world. One of the main reasons that  they have had such a hype surrounding them is because they tackle issues that are hard hitting to the public.

3 – Break Free (Ruby Rose, 2014)

Break Free went viral across social media in 2015 due to the heavy publicity that Ruby Rose received from entering the cast of  Orange Is The New Black. The film was directed by Ruby Rose herself and uploaded to YouTube on 14th July 2014. The short film focuses primarily on gender roles and the idea of gender fluidity. The film raises awareness of what life can be like when you are different than social norms (e.g. bigender and transgender). In the film we see Ruby Rose transform herself from a woman into a man through clothing and behavioral stereotypes. No wonder people claimed that she made the question their sexuality. – The film has now reached over 15 million views on YouTube.

2 – ReMoved (Nathanial Matanick, 2014)

ReMoved was released on YouTube on the 11th March 2014 and although it only has just over 4 million views the issues expressed in the narrative are certainly hard hitting and tear inducing. ReMoved follows the life of a young girl and her brother as they are taken from a violent and unstable home to live life between foster homes until they find a foster parent who won’t give up on them or abuse them. The narrative follows on in part 2 where we see that the young girl as a grown woman who has broken the cycle of abuse to become a child care practitioner. The second part has just under 900,000 views which is a shame as it tackles the stories of victims of child abuse and expresses true to life thoughts and feelings of a victim of this kind of abuse.

“Sometimes someone hurts you so bad; it stops hurting at all. Until something makes you feel again. Then it all comes back. Every word. Every hurt. Every moment.” – Zoe

1 – Love Is All You Need (Kim Rocco Shields, 2012)

Love Is All You Need went viral because it exposed hard-hitting experiences of homophobic abuse only reversed to show what it would be like if heterophobia was in place of it. It effectively changes the ideologies of people who have homophobic values as they get to see that the bullying they inflict can cause suicide. The film was uploaded to YouTube on 16th August 2012 and has just over 3.5 million views. Controversy was brought around this film in 2015 as a teacher in the US reportedly lost her job for showing this film to her students as a method of tackling homophobia.


Short films conventionally tackle issues (e.g. abuse etc.) that larger, Hollywood films would usually avoid for purposes of attracting a universal audience. These short films have certainly used this convention to impact the audience emotionally and are effective in raising awareness of the social taboos their stories cover.