General Updates

If We Were Having Coffee // A Moment to Acknowledge Progress

ZEN AND PI

Hello, happy Sunday, welcome, and thank you for stopping by for a bit of coffee and catching up. Forgive me for not sitting down. I’ll have to take my caffeine and converse while I’m getting ready because we have an appointment to tour our dream wedding venue today! I would have waited to chat with you until after but I am afraid I’ll be told the place is out of our meager budget and return broken-hearted and depressed. No, better to visit now, while I’m excited and have my past week still fresh in my head.

“I cannot simply put into words how coffee, stars, and a good conversation turns me on.”

constellationsofmisery

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If we were having coffee, I would tell you that there you may start seeing more of me around here than you have lately. I know posts have been few and far between and far from fun…

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Belittling another Cyster’s fight won’t help you win yours…

Ever since I was diagnosed with PCOS, I have noticed a divide in the cysterhood that is very hard to ignore. There are those that are winning their fight and those who still haven’t found the right path yet. Due to the lack of education on the subject of PCOS, many of the women who suffer have a lack of understanding as to how the illness works. 

 If they read up on the illness enough when they got diagnosed they would know that every woman’s fight is different and we all have a different cocktail of symptoms. Some women have it more aggressive than others. Support each other ladies! Do what works for you!

I hate it when my Cyster’s used to tell me my fight is wrong before I found what worked for me. I would feel bad about myself. I would feel as though I was inferior in comparison to others. 

So, I was scrolling through Tumblr and I came across his post from a blog called alittlebitofpcos and I thought I would share it with you all. This is so important.

Know Your Pl

By that I’m saying, you are not in the place to police and harass someone for their lifestyle choices, especially when it comes to their PCOS. I see this a lot in the community, a person will find what works for them and push it onto other people, or be cruel when it comes to other people choosing to manage their PCOS differently. Even worse, people who don’t have PCOS or have any knowledge on the condition go trolling with their Dr. Google pedestal.

That is not your place.

How someone chooses to manage their PCOS is on them and their doctor. Unless they are asking for personal experience and advice, keep your opinions to yourself. Some prefer natural supplements to medications, some find changing their eating is what works for them, and some only take birth control.

PCOS symptoms vary for everyone, as does management options. Just because you found eating vegan or organic or not taking the medications commonly prescribed worked for you, does not mean someone else will find success with that, or have the means to do so. Some people simply cannot afford basic treatment and medication, let alone the funds for a complete lifestyle change.

Don’t shame someone for eating differently, choosing an alternative approach, or doing the best they can with what is within their means just because it isn’t what you are doing and found to help you.

Do you think people who are newly diagnosed and don’t even understand the condition need someone shaming them? Do you think someone who doesn’t have the financial resources to eat healthier doesn’t know how it could benefit their health? That they just can’t afford it? Everyone knows the concerns and fears that are experienced right after being diagnosed and all the little challenges that come up along the way. No one needs shame and ridicule when life is already a hell of a challenge on its own, let alone adding PCOS to it.

THAT IS NOT YOUR PLACE.

I felt immense shame after my diagnosis, for three years in fact. Not because people were shaming me, but because I didn’t understand it or have support, and in my case (not everyone’s, keep in mind) I felt like I was failing as a female because my body wasn’t working as it intended to. Can you imagine being shamed by someone for my lifestyle choices, on top of what I was already feeling between the ages of 15-18? I’ll be damned if someone else in this community is made to feel that way. We are supposed to be there for advice and support and encouragement. Not to make someone feel less than what they already do for a condition they had no control over getting diagnosed with in the first place.

PCOS is difficult on its own to live with. It takes a physical and emotional toll on people in vastly different ways. While one person may have minimal symptoms, there are so people out there struggling with so much more than what the condition entails.

PCOS can’t be cured, no matter what food choices, medications, essential oils, or lifestyle changes you make. Don’t push that onto anyone because it’s a load of crap–what I mean is, don’t be an asshole with, “Well THIS is what cures PCOS and since you aren’t doing it, you’re ___.” It’s a known fact with reliable PCOS sources and medical professionals that there is no cure, it can be managed and symptoms improve, but the moment you change what you’re doing, they will come back. They do not even know the true cause yet, let alone how to find a cure.

Before you found what worked for you, YOU were struggling, and most likely had to try different approaches before finding what helped improve your symptoms. Think the next time you leave a nasty comment on someone’s post or page, because you were once in their position.

Spread awareness, positivity, support–but do not shame others for being at a different place in their journey.

@alittlebitofpcos (Tumblr)

Weight Watchers is going after children and Sam thinks that’s extra awful

FIT IS A FEMINIST ISSUE

As you may know, if you’re a blog regular, I hate Weight Watchers.

They’re now marketing to children, offering free classes with parent’s permission. See here.

Rebecca Scritchfield writes,

“Weight Watchers this week announced its plans to offer free six-week memberships to kids as young as 13, beginning this summer. The company’s move is part of a bigger plan to grow revenue and a loyal customer base for life. (Start ’em young, right?) As a health professional and mother, I am appalled. With celebrity names such as Oprah Winfrey, who is on the board of directors, and DJ Khaled, the latest spokesperson for Weight Watchers, the company is on track to exert powerful influence on people far and wide. Kids will undoubtedly pay a heavy price for this “free” membership, in the form of body shame. It will not only affect those who participate, but also every other…

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Depression and Body Image

Since I started to lose weight with PCOS, I have recieved several messages from all kinds of women, with or without the condition, telling me that I have been an inspiration to them and that makes me so happy. The thing is there has been a few that have opened up to me about their motivation problems and how their body issues depress them but they still can’t find the motivation to do anything about it. Well, I’m here to tell you… same here!

I havent always been such a collected person. I haven’t always had this motivation. Sure, I used to try to lose weight and fail but there was a long time where I had given up on getting back to health and just accepted that ‘fate had other plans for me.’ My body got me down. I used to stare in the mirror and cry sometimes because of the sight of me.

I was so depressed by my size. I’d often find myself thinking about being able to just cut it all off or even starve myself to get there. It wasn’t until I learned to love my body before I was able to take care of it. Just like I said in my previous post, you can’t fix your body to fix your mind.

You have to retrain your thought processes to be able to look at your body and like it. Depression makes you less likely to look after yourself. Key signs ofm it are a lack of personal hygeine and over or under eating. Afterall, why would you want to treat your body like a templem if you hate it?

I started retraining my thoughts with three simple things:

1) Notice the little things you like about yourself –  There will always be tiny things about yourself that you do like. The voices are just in the way. Focus on them! I learned to love my eyes, lips, hips and breasts first.

2) Look at other women who are of your size or bigger who are famous online – The movement of plus size models on social media played a big part in helping me love my body. I was a large girl and looking at people like Tess Holiday and Ashley Graham on instagram helped me love the way my hips curve and appreciate that I had curves.

3) Listen to what other people like about you – Whether it’s your friends or a partner, when they tell you something that they like about you, listen. Don’t put yourself down or let yourself think that they don’t mean it. THEY DO MEAN IT!

Once you have learned to love yourself, it will be easier to have the energy and motivation to take care of your mental and physical health and a lot of the time the two are closely linked.

I hate writing endings…

I have been writing since I was 4 and my Gran taught me how. I was always writing short stories and poetry whenever I had a good idea for one and it became the most paramount hobby that I had in my life.

I never used to have an issue with writing endings until I started writing novels after I got into it during Nanowrimo that I completed in 2010 and 2011. I now struggle to wrap a story up which is strange because I always know exactly how I want my story to go.

I just seem to automatically get writer’s block towards the end. I feel like this maybe just be because I am subconsciously attached to my story and characters so that I don’t want my story to end, in the same way, a mother doesn’t want her children to grow up. My books are like my babies, they are a part of me and there’s nothing I can do about it.